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Concurrently with the weekday run, from 1975 to 1981, a once-a-week fringe time version, Match Game PM, was also offered in syndication for airing just before prime time hours.

Match Game returned to NBC in 1983 as part of a sixty-minute hybrid series with Hollywood Squares, then saw a daytime run on ABC in 1990 and another for syndication in 1998; each of these series lasted one season.

NBC also occasionally used special episodes of the series as a gap-filling program in prime time if one of its movies had an irregular time slot.

Although the series still did well in the ratings (despite the popularity of ABC's horror-themed soap opera Dark Shadows), it was cancelled in 1969 along with other games in a major daytime programming overhaul, being replaced by Letters to Laugh-In which, although a spin-off of the popular prime time series Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, ended in just three months, on December 26.

In addition, many of the frequent panelists on the early episodes were not regulars later in the series but had appeared on the 1960s version, including Klugman, Arlene Francis, and Bert Convy, the last of whom was later chosen as host of the show's 1990 revival before being diagnosed with a brain tumor which eventually took his life.

However, the double entendre in the question "Johnny always put butter on his _____" marked a turning point in the questions on the show.

Each contestant who agreed with the most popular answer to a question earned the team , for a possible total of 0.

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The year in the title was updated on the New Year's Eve broadcast for the next six years.The Match Game continued through September 26, 1969, on NBC for 1,760 episodes, airing at pm Central), running 25 minutes due to a five-minute newscast.Since Olson split time between New York and Miami to announce The Jackie Gleason Show, one of the network's New York staff announcers (such as Don Pardo or Wayne Howell) filled-in for Olson when he could not attend a broadcast.On March 27, 1967, the show added a "Telephone Match" game, in which a home viewer and a studio audience member attempted to match a simple fill-in-the-blank question, similar to the 1970s' "Head-To-Head Match".

A successful match won a jackpot, which started at 0 and increased by 0 per day until won.

As part of this overhaul, the network reintroduced game shows beginning in 1972.